VIDEO: Extended Interview with Mumia Abu-Jamal on New Pennsylvania Law Restricting Prisonerz’ Speech

Would be curious to hear others thoughts on the implication of this law? Supposing what seems to be unlikely that it does get upheld?

Moorbey'z Blog

VIDEO: Extended Interview with Mumia Abu-Jamal on New Pennsylvania Law Restricting Prisoners’ Speech
In Pennsylvania, Republican Gov. Tom Corbett has signed into law a bill critics say will trample the free speech rights of prisoners. Dubbed the “Mumia bill,” the measure was introduced after imprisoned journalist and former Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal gave a pretaped commencement address at Vermont’s Goddard College. His speech was opposed by Pennsylvania officials and the widow of Daniel Faulkner, the police officer whom Abu-Jamal was convicted of killing. The law authorizes the censoring of public addresses of prisoners or former offenders if judges agree that allowing them to speak would cause “mental anguish” to the victim. Speaking to Democracy Now! from prison this week, Mumia Abu Jamal said that by signing the law, Governor Corbett had violated the Constitution.
Mumia Abu-Jamal: “As a governor and as an attorney and a member of the…

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An Overview of Public Opinion and Discourse on Criminal Justice Issues

Source: opportunityagenda.org

A very lengthy a well done report, summarizing a years worth of meta-analysis and independent research done to inform an understanding of public opinion on criminal justice issues. Let me go ahead and recommend the executive summary for those not wanting to wade through a 100 page report.

One thought off the cuff though- a suggestion is made that messaging should focus more on values (e.g ethical arguments for criminal justice reform) and less of fiscal impacts, as the latter is disproportionally given in the media. If I understand it correctly, the intent behind this recommendation is to a.) even the understanding of arguments in favor of reform and b.) If we want to bring about PSE changes, an ethical transition is what is ideal. After all if it’s really just fiscal issues we care about, cheaper ways of incarcerating people would become a viable alternative (if they existed).

Curious to hear others thoughts on this.